My name is Marcus Ramirez, and I am currently a tactical strength and conditioning coach for the United States Army, a strength and conditioning coach for youth athletes at Olympia High School, and an Olympic Weightlifting Coach for a small team of competitive olympic weightlifting athletes. To put it simply, I work with a very diverse background of athletes and individuals, and I am in the business of developing strong people.

Yes, we all know incorporating resistance training a few times into our weekly routine has copious amounts of health benefits to our physical, physiological, and mental well being and does a great deal for increasing longevity and decreasing the probability of injury and illness. With the fact that “strength” is in my job title, I may be biased in the fact that I believe increasing strength is the greatest benefit we can gain for ourselves when participating in any training program or exercise routine.

To increase strength, one must develop a training program that is tailored to that goal as well as his or her abilities, experience, and practical application. As a coach my general training philosophy is to identify the needs of the individual or team and develop a program that takes a full body approach and focuses on increasing the appropriate strength qualities based on that analysis. In general, I identify the needs and goals, and use a science based approach to develop a program accordingly.

For those of us that want to use training for personal goals such as to increase muscle mass, decrease fat mass, and improve overall body composition and health, then the strength and conditioning approach can easily be applied into creating your own training program.

Below is an example of a full body training day that starts with a dynamic based warm-up, focuses on two strength blocks, implements a metabolic conditioning block, and finishes with an appropriate post workout stretch to bring all training pieces together. Each exercise has the sets, reps, and tempo at which the exercise should be executed (i.e. 2011 means 2 second eccentric motion, 0 seconds hold at that position, 1 second concentric motion, and 1 second hold at start point). The emphasis of this training day is to increase relative strength and hypertrophy as well as develop aerobic capacity.

STRENGTH & CONDITIONING PROGRAM

Dynamic WU 10-min

FULL BODY STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT

A1: TRAP BAR SQUAT

X6 @ 2011   

X6 @ 2011

X6 @ 2011

A2: SL PRONE HAMSTRING CURL

X6s @ 50x1

X6s @ 50x1

X6s @ 50x1

A3: T-SPINE ROTATION

X6 @ 2011   

X6 @ 2011

X6 @ 2011

B1: BB OVERHEAD PRESS

X6 @ 2011   

X6 @ 2011

X6 @ 2011

B2: INCLINE ALT DB PRESS

X6s @ 50x1

X6s @ 50x1

X6s @ 50x1

B3: CONTRALATERAL DB ROW

X6s @ 10x5

X6s @ 10x5

X6s @ 10x5

C1: AIR ASSAULT BIKE

x15 cal

x15 cal

x15 cal

C2: FARMER CARRY 

x60

x60

x60

POST-STRETCH FOAM ROLL SERIES 10 MIN

Now, I have been a strength and conditioning coach for several years, and again have been fortunate enough to work with a diverse background of people. I have coached individuals, teams, and programs ranging from youth, collegiate, and professional athletes to the tactical population in training Air Force Fighter Pilots and my current role working with our servicemen of the United States Army. Throughout this time, I have had success in applying the principles of exercise science and the art of coaching into creating a culture that develops strong people. What I mean by that is, as a coach, I place great emphasis on empowering individuals to embody strength as a mentality, and training to have the strength to get through the adversities life may throw at us.

Whether we are training for sport, competition, military operations, or just everyday life, the purpose of strength training applies. Though the specifics of training programs for each population may differ, the approach remains the same: increase strength to help decrease risk of injury and illness.

As I have witnessed and professed time and time again, “Strong People Don’t Break”.